Business report writing examples ukm

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Business report writing examples ukm

The key to a successful report is effective planning, so before you start writing the report consider the following points. Identify your target audience Identifying who you are writing for will help to shape the content of the report.

If the report will be submitted as part of a qualification, check that you know what your tutor expects and the assessment criteria for the report.

Also think about stakeholders in the organisation; the report is an ideal opportunity to demonstrate how you, as an HR professional, can add value and help you influence change.

Who will read the report and what are they looking for? What will you want them to do as a result of reading the report? Scope, size and deadline Clear aims and objectives specify the purpose of the report and show your reader what you are aiming to do.

Once you know the size and scope of your report you can then start to estimate the work required and the time available to do it.

Collecting relevant information The range of topics on which an HR practitioner might write a report is very wide. This means that there is plenty of material that you can consult before starting to write.

Understanding the report structure A report is a structured form of writing, designed to be read quickly and accurately. The sections of a report might not be read consecutively so it is important to understand the structure and convention of report-writing.

CIPD recommend the following structure: Title The title should indicate clearly the focus of the report. Executive summary This is a brief summary of the report, no longer than one page, which is designed to help the reader decide whether they wish to read the full report.

Although it is the first thing to be read, it should be written last and should include: Table of contents This shows how the report is structured and indicates the page numbers of the main elements. You should also include a list of charts and diagrams where appropriate and any appendices.

Introduction The purpose of the introduction is to set the scene and show how the chosen topic seeks to address an issue of strategic relevance to the organisation. A brief explanation of the organisational context can highlight the key drivers that are influencing the business and demonstrate a rationale for the report.

The introduction should also outline the aims and objectives of the study. The aim clarifies what the report is trying to achieve while the objectives are more specific and show how the issue will be addressed. The introduction can also outline the scope of the report including any boundaries or constraints that may apply or affect the progress of the study.

The purpose of the literature review is to put the issue under investigation into perspective and demonstrate your knowledge of the key works and latest findings on the topic. HR practitioners who are writing a report solely for a business audience might find it inappropriate to include a literature review.

However, consider including recent surveys or other material to support any proposals contained with the report. A student who is writing a report for academic purposes must always carry out a literature review to identify the sources used for the theoretical concepts that underpin the report.

The literature review should be a discussion and critical evaluation of published material including books, journal articles, research reports and discussion papers. The literature review should also aim to explain the issue in the context of contemporary ideas and thinking, including a discussion of relevant models, concepts, ideas and current good practice.

It can help to summarise the key issues derived from the literature at the end of this section and show how this relates to your own research of the topic.

Research methods This section must explain what you did to gather the information that you are presenting. You should explain the approach used such as questionnaires, interviews, and so onwhy you took this approach and how you decided what sample of people to include in any surveys that you undertook.

You should also demonstrate an awareness of alternative methods, the suitability of primary and secondary data sources to your investigation, ethical considerations and any logistical problems you may have encountered.

We recommend that you consult and make reference to texts on research methods to justify why your chosen approach was suitable and, therefore, why the resulting findings are robust enough to base business decisions on them.

Findings, analysis and discussion Your results should be presented as clearly as possible so that they are easily understood and accessible to the reader. Graphs, charts and diagrams can be used to identify the key findings. In this section you should also analyse and interpret the results by drawing on the research you have collected and explaining its significance.

You should also suggest explanations for your findings and any outline any issues that may have influenced the results. You should ensure that any responses from individuals are anonymised, unless you have the express written permission of the individual to refer to their response by name.

business report writing examples ukm

Conclusions and recommendations This section draws together the main issues identified in the report and should refer back to the aims and objectives — has the report achieved what it set out to do?

This section should not include any new material. The recommendations should be actionable and feasible in the organisational context. You should show what needs to be done and why.person or group asking for the report. One example—four small county hospitals are no longer When you inform or analyze for a business report, your job is not to dazzle with vocabulary, jargon, or complex sentences.

Creative, adjective-filled prose does not belong in a business General suggestions on writing business reports. Quiz & Worksheet - Business Report Writing Quiz; Course; To learn more about this topic, study the corresponding lesson called Writing a Business Report: Structure & Examples.

The lesson. These business writing documents also take on different styles depending on the audience of those who receive the documents.

This guide to business writing points you in the direction of the wide variety of resources available on the site. In business, the information provided in reports needs to be easy to find, and written in such a way that the client can understand it.

This is one reason why reports are divided into sections clearly labelled with headings and sub-headings. business and report writing at Charles Sturt University (CSU). Although this program does highlight many important areas of business and report writing, further application of the concepts, principles and skills will help to refine and reinforce your.

A business report is a document in which the author analyses a business issue and gives recommendations based on that analysis. It may also be referred to as writing a business case or a manager’s briefing. HR practitioners are likely to write business reports to summarise their investigations.

How to Write a Business Report | Study Guide | CIPD